COVID-19 Information Center

Texas State University is committed to keeping our community safe and our students advancing toward their educational goals. This page gathers all COVID-19 resources and recommendations in one location so you can easily find the information you need.

COVID-19 Community Level: LOW

According to the CDC, the level of COVID-19 in our community is currently low. This takes into account the number of new cases and the potential strain on the health system.
CDC illustration of coronavirus

Low Community Level Guidance

Based on data from the CDC, the best prevention steps are:

  • Stay up to date with COVID-19 vaccines and boosters
  • Improve ventilation indoors
  • Avoid contact with people who have suspected or confirmed COVID-19
  • Review post-exposure recommendations if you have been in close contact with someone positive for COVID-19
  • Follow isolation guidance if you suspect you have COVID-19 or if you have tested positive

Persons who are immunocompromised or at high risk for severe disease should:

  • Talk to a healthcare provider about additional precautions
  • Wear a well-fitting, high-quality mask or respirator when indoors in public

If you have contact with someone at high risk for severe disease:

  • Consider testing yourself to detect infection before meeting with them
  • Consider wearing a well-fitting, high-quality mask when indoors with them

For more information, visit the CDC's COVID-19 Community Levels webpage.

Vaccination and Treatment

The Student Health Center at Texas State offers vaccines for COVID-19. Treatments for those experiencing COVID-19 symptoms are available by prescription in the local community.

COVID-19 Vaccines

Vaccination is vital to the country’s efforts to bring the pandemic to an end. Vaccines have proven to be safe and effective with no evidence of any long-term side-effects. They continue to be highly effective in preventing serious illness, hospitalization, and death.

Texas State University offers Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines by appointment at both the San Marcos and Round Rock campuses. Vaccinations are provided at no cost to the individual.

Student with mask holding a sticker for receiving a COVID-19 vaccine

COVID-19 Vaccine FAQs

Answers to some commonly asked questions about vaccines are provided below.

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  • No, COVID-19 vaccination is not required to attend classes or work at Texas State at this time.

    Vaccination is strongly recommended to protect yourself from developing serious illness due to COVID-19. It may also help decrease the spread of the infection to others.

    Studies continue to assess all the potential benefits of vaccination.

  • Most COVID-19 vaccines require two doses to produce the optimum immune response and protection. Completing your primary vaccination series is important to developing and extending your immunity.

    COVID-19 vaccine boosters can further enhance or restore protection that may have waned over time since completing your primary vaccination series.

    People are protected best from severe COVID-19 illness when they stay up to date with their COVID-19 vaccines, which includes a booster for many people. To learn more about the benefits of boosters, see the CDC's Frequently Asked Questions about COVID-19 Vaccination.

  • COVID-19 boosters are currently recommended for individuals 5 and older. Additional boosters are recommended for those 50 and older or for those who have moderately to severely compromised immune systems.

    Complete eligibility for boosters is outlined on the CDC's COVID-19 Vaccine Boosters webpage.

    To receive a booster at Texas State, schedule an appointment with the Student Health Center by calling (512) 245-2161.

  • According to the CDC, none of the approved COVID-19 vaccines can cause you to test positive on viral tests, which assess for current infection.​

    If you develop an immune response after you are vaccinated, which is the desired effect, you may test positive on antibody tests. Antibody tests indicate previous infection and that you may have some level of protection against the virus.

  • Yes, the CDC recommends that persons who have been previously infected with COVID-19 get vaccinated.

    It is unclear how long the natural immunity that develops after infection lasts. Because it is rare that a person infected with COVID-19 will be reinfected within 90 days due to their natural immunity, they can wait up to 90 days before getting vaccinated.

COVID-19 Treatments

For those experiencing symptoms of COVID-19, new treatments are available.

Possible Treatment Options for COVID-19
by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Read More about Possible Treatment Options for COVID-19
COVID-19 Public Therapeutic Locator
by HealthData.gov Read More about COVID-19 Public Therapeutic Locator
12 Things To Know About Paxlovid, the Latest COVID-19 Pill
by Kathy Katella Read More about 12 Things To Know About Paxlovid, the Latest COVID-19 Pill

COVID-19 Testing

Testing is critical to our efforts to keep our campuses healthy and safe. COVID-19 testing is recommended after known or suspected close contact to a person with COVID-19 and when COVID-19 symptoms are present.

Testing to Protect Yourself and Others

COVID-19 testing is an effective tool for protecting yourself and others. Testing yourself just before the start of a semester helps keep COVID-19 out of our campuses. Testing when you have symptoms of a cold or allergy, such as runny nose, sinus congestion, sore throat, cough, fever, body aches, chronic fatigue, or shortness of breath is important, as these can be symptoms of COVID-19. If visiting family or friends who are elderly or at high risk for severe illness, get tested before visiting to protect them. Testing is also recommended after travel by air, bus, or train and after high-risk activities, such as going to a bar or attending a crowded indoor or outdoor event.

Testing on Campus

All Texas State faculty, staff, and students with health insurance are eligible for testing at the testing sites on campus. Persons without health insurance are no longer eligible for free testing due to a lack of federal funding. Uninsured individuals may order free at-home antigen tests from the U.S. government. Rapid antigen tests can be purchased for $10 at the Student Health Center Pharmacy in San Marcos.

For testing appointments, please bring your health insurance card, Texas State ID, and driver's license (or government-issued ID). Specific information about on-campus testing locations is provided below.

On-Campus San Marcos Locations

Curative on the San Marcos Campus

The Curative testing kiosk is located on the plaza between Flowers Hall and the Evans Liberal Arts building. Persons with health insurance may register for the free test online. 

Available Times:
Monday through Friday • 8 a.m. – 7 p.m.

MD Diagnostic on the San Marcos Campus

For the Fall 2022 semester, the MD Diagnostic testing kiosk will be relocating to the Student Health Center parking lot. PCR test results will be provided same-day and rapid antigen test results in 20 minutes. Testing will be available beginning the afternoon of August 16th. Students, faculty, and staff may register for their test online or walk up for testing. MD Diagnostic will bill your insurance.

Scheduled Testing:
Monday through Friday • 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Walk-In Hours:
Monday through Friday • 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.

On-Campus Round Rock Location

Student Health Center on the Round Rock Campus

Faculty, staff, and students can call (512) 245-2161 and select option 2 to schedule a COVID-19 test in the Student Health Center in Round Rock. Testing is only available for individuals who are symptomatic or a close contact. Screening testing is not available. Testing at this clinic will be sent to Clinical Pathology Laboratories (CPL) for analysis. Results will be sent to the patient through their portal.

Operating Hours:
Monday, Wednesday, and Friday
9 a.m. – 12 p.m. and 1 p.m. – 5 p.m.

Map of Round Rock location for Student Health Center

Off-Campus Testing in the Round Rock Community

Additional COVID-19 testing sites are available in the local community that offer different schedules and services. Location and appointment scheduling details are below.

Curative Trailer in Georgetown

Location:
707 S. Martin Luther King Jr. St., Georgetown, TX 78626

Operating Hours:
Monday through Friday • 8 a.m. – 6 p.m.

Curative Kiosk in Round Rock

Location:
2008 Enterprise Dr., Round Rock, TX 78664

Operating Hours:
Monday through Friday • 8 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Saturday and Sunday • 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

What to Do If You Are Sick

If you think you may be experiencing COVID-19 illness, please review the symptoms and next steps in the sections below.

Symptoms of COVID-19

COVID-19 illness may be associated with a range of symptoms that appear 2–14 days after exposure to the virus. Illness may be mild to severe. Some of the more common symptoms of COVID-19 are listed below.

Thermometer displaying a fever of 101.3

Fever or chills
Cough
Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
Fatigue
Muscle or body aches
Headache
New loss of taste or smell
Sore throat
Congestion or runny nose
Nausea or vomiting
Diarrhea

For more information, see the CDC's Symptoms of COVID-19.

Next Steps If You Are Ill

Review the common symptoms of COVID-19.

Isolate yourself immediately if you are experiencing COVID-19 symptoms. Individuals with COVID-19 sometimes experience mild symptoms, few symptoms, or no symptoms at all.

Get tested for COVID-19. Viral testing is recommended at least 5 days after last exposure to COVID-19. If you are not aware of particular COVID-19 exposure but have developed symptoms, test right away. For more information, see the CDC's page on COVID-19 Testing

Remain in isolation until your test result is available. If you take a rapid test, you should receive your result within minutes. If you receive laboratory testing, you may have to wait for your test result for one or more days.

Contact instructors and supervisors. You are encouraged to directly contact your instructors and supervisors to make arrangements while you wait for your test result and in the event your test result comes back positive.

If the test result is positive, review the following section, "Next Steps After Receiving a Positive COVID-19 Test."

If the test result is negative, you may return to work and school once your symptoms have improved and you are fever-free for 24 hours without taking a fever-reducing medicine.

What to Do If You Test Positive

If you have taken a COVID-19 test and received a positive result, please review our recommendations for next steps.

Next Steps After Receiving a Positive COVID-19 Test

Hand holding colorful masks

Isolate. It is important to complete your isolation following the steps outlined on the CDC's webpage for Isolation and Precautions for People with COVID-19. A calculator is available at the top of the page to help you determine your isolation period. If symptoms worsen or fail to improve during your isolation period, seek medical attention.

If at high risk for serious illness from COVID-19, get treatment. Review the CDC's COVID-19 Information for Specific Groups of People to assess your level of risk. You may also wish to review the CDC's page on COVID-19 Treatments and Medications.

Contact your instructors and supervisors. Notify instructors and supervisors that you will be away from class and work due to a medically necessary absence. For extended isolation, a medical note may be required by an instructor or supervisor.

If living on campus, contact your residence hall director.

Masking and Social Distancing

Masking and social distancing are two important strategies for reducing the spread of COVID-19. Read on for our recommendations.

Choosing the Right Mask

Texas State student wearing KN95 mask

When choosing a face covering, select the most protective mask or respirator you can that fits well and can be worn consistently.

Masks are made to contain the particles you breathe, cough, or sneeze out and can provide some protection from the particles spread by others. Like masks, respirators can contain the particles you breathe, cough, or sneeze out, but they also protect you by filtering the air you breathe in.

Loosely woven cloth masks offer the least protection, while layered finely woven products offer more. The most protective masks are disposable surgical masks that prevent leaks at the nose, chin, and sides of face.

Respirators, such as N95s and KN95s, offer the highest level of protection and are recommended for higher risk situations and for people at risk for severe disease.

Remember, any mask is better than no mask. Fore more information on mask selection, see the CDC's webpage on Types of Masks and Respirators.

When to Wear a Mask

At any time, you can wear a mask based on your personal preference and risk level. When your local COVID-19 community level is high, the CDC recommends wearing a mask in public indoor settings, regardless of vaccination status.

There are a number of situations where the CDC recommends choosing a mask with greater protection:

  • For people who are immunocompromised, older adults, and people with certain underlying medical conditions
  • When caring for someone who is sick
  • When working at a job with high interaction with the public
  • When riding on buses, trains, and airplanes
  • When physical distancing is not possible in crowded public settings
  • If you are not up to date on COVID-19 vaccinations

For more information on when to wear masks, see the CDC's webpage on Use and Care of Masks.

Social Distancing and Public Gatherings

Students seated and social distancing

The CDC recommends staying 6 feet away from others in several situations:

  • At home when a household member is positive for COVID-19
  • Indoors in public if you are not up to date on COVID-19 vaccines
  • In crowded places if you are at increased risk for severe illness

When COVID-19 transmission levels are high, social distancing is recommended in public indoor spaces.

Travel Guidance

If you are planning a domestic or international trip, check out our resources for traveling safely and staying current on COVID-19 requirements.

Recommendations for Safe Travel

Currently, the CDC recommends wearing well-fitting masks or respirators when using public transportation or spending time indoors in transportation hubs. Before traveling, individuals should be up to date on COVID-19 vaccines.

Travel is not recommended for those with COVID-19 symptoms, those awaiting test results or who have tested positive for COVID-19, or those who have had close contact with a person with COVID-19.

Before traveling, you should review the COVID-19 Community Level at your destination. Follow your destination's travel restrictions and consider testing no more than 3 days before travel.

For more information, see the CDC's webpages on Domestic Travel During COVID-19 and International Travel.

Current Travel Requirements

Before traveling domestically, review the requirements of your destination using the CDC's Health Department Directories. When planning international travel, you can find country-specific requirements on the Department of State's COVID-19 Travel page.

At this time, air passengers arriving in the U.S. from foreign countries are not required to show a negative COVID-19 test before boarding a flight. Proof of vaccination may be required depending on citizenship status. For more information, see the CDC's COVID-19 Travel webpage.

Frequently Asked Questions

Use the links below to navigate our FAQ section.

FAQs for Faculty

  • If you have had close contact with someone positive for COVID-19, review the CDC's What to Do If You Were Exposed to COVID-19 webpage to determine which precautions you are required to take. 

    Get tested at least 5 full days after your last close contact with someone infectious with COVID-19. If your test result is positive, follow CDC guidance for Isolation and notify your department chair/school director to make arrangements for continuity of instruction.

  • Review the CDC's Isolation page for guidance about isolation and additional safety measures. Faculty who are absent from class should also coordinate with their chairs/directors to ensure continuity of instruction.

    An asymptomatic faculty member who teaches face-to-face classes may briefly transition to remote learning for an isolation period by using Zoom, Teams, Canvas, or other tools. These transitions, which may be due to emergency or unforeseeable events, do not count against the in-person contact hours required by instruction modes. The university recognizes the flexibility needed during times of emergencies and unforeseeable events.

  • If a student reports that they have tested positive for COVID-19, you should keep the information confidential and recommend that they follow CDC guidance for next steps. The CDC has developed an Isolation Calculator to help cases determine the appropriate dates for isolation. After completing a five-day isolation period, students should wear a face mask for an additional five days. Faculty have discretion in managing student absences related to COVID-19 and should determine appropriate arrangements for students who miss class.

  • No. All employees, including faculty, must safeguard the privacy of infected persons. Releasing the names of students who tested positive for COVID-19, or their close contacts, violates their privacy and confidentiality.

  • With COVID-19 continuing to circulate in our communities, it would not be unusual to receive several reports of positive tests during the course of a semester. However, an instructor who receives a significantly greater number of positive reports in a class during a week may choose to inform their class of the higher number of positive cases and encourage students to get tested.

  • As in the past, faculty have discretion in managing student absences, including those due to illness. Faculty members determine appropriate arrangements for students who miss class. Faculty should encourage students who test positive for COVID-19 to follow CDC recommendations for isolation. A calculator is available to determine the appropriate dates for isolation and other safety measures.  

    If a face-to-face class has a large number of absences and the instructor experiences difficulty in managing make-up assignments and course delivery, remote learning and alternative strategies are at the instructor’s discretion. For example, the instructor may choose to temporarily use Zoom so absent students are able to observe lectures and class activities. An instructor may record and distribute lectures, add discussion boards in Canvas, create substitute assignments, or implement some other plan.

  • If you did not see an answer to your question in the FAQs above, you may submit it to shccovid@txstate.edu. In your email, do not include any protected health information or identifying information for persons who may have been exposed to COVID-19. You should receive a response to your question within one day Monday through Friday.

FAQs for Supervisors

FAQs for Students

  • If you have been in close contact with a person who tested positive for COVID-19, please review the CDC's page on What to Do If You Were Exposed to COVID-19. Safety precautions, including wearing a mask and monitoring for symptoms, are required for 10 full days following exposure.

    Testing for COVID-19 should be conducted at least 5 full days after your last exposure to the positive case. If your test result is positive, follow the isolation protocol described on the CDC's Isolation page.

    If you are required to isolate, you should contact your professors, and supervisor if applicable, to notify them that you will be away from class or work due to a medically necessary absence.

  • Students who test positive for COVID-19 should isolate at home away from others. The CDC's Isolation Calculator can be used to help you determine your isolation period and when it is safe to return to class or work. A face mask should be worn for an additional 5 days after ending isolation.

    Students should also contact their professors, and supervisor if applicable, to notify them that they will be away from class or work due to a medically necessary absence.

    If you live in a residence hall, you should isolate yourself, wear a face mask, and notify your residence hall director.

  • No. A negative test is not required. After completing the recommended 5-day isolation period, students with confirmed cases of COVID-19 may return to class or work. However, if a student is still visibly ill, an instructor or supervisor can require them to leave the class or workplace. Students should wear a face mask when around others for an additional 5 days after leaving isolation.

    Getting a rapid antigen test at the end of isolation is recommended and a good way to determine if you are still infectious. However, an antigen test is not required to return to class or work. For more information on antigen testing following isolation, please review the CDC's Isolation page. 

    For extended isolation, a medical note may be required by an instructor or supervisor.

  • Students are expected to notify their professors/instructors in cases of absence due to COVID-19. Faculty have discretion in managing student absences, including those due to illness. Faculty members determine appropriate arrangements for students who miss class. If an extended absence from class is required, a professor may request that a student provide some form of medical documentation substantiating the need for the extended absence.

  • If you did not see an answer to your question in the FAQs above, you may submit it to shccovid@txstate.edu. In your email, do not include any protected health information or identifying information for persons who may have been exposed to COVID-19. You should receive a response to your question within one day Monday through Friday.

University Statements

Read the latest Texas State COVID-19 updates.

Other COVID-19 Resources

Check out our collection of local, state, and federal resources on COVID-19 for more information.